skip navigation

PUBLICATIONS

Register for Latest Research

Stay Informed
Register with NCJRS to receive NCJRS's biweekly e-newsletter JUSTINFO and additional periodic emails from NCJRS and the NCJRS federal sponsors that highlight the latest research published or sponsored by the Office of Justice Programs.

NCJRS Abstract

The document referenced below is part of the NCJRS Virtual Library collection. To conduct further searches of the collection, visit the Virtual Library. See the Obtain Documents page for direction on how to access resources online, via mail, through interlibrary loans, or in a local library.

 

NCJ Number: 152878 Find in a Library
Title: Understanding Mentoring Relationships
Author(s): R N Saito; D A Blyth
Date Published: 1994
Page Count: 40
Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
Search Institute
Minneapolis, MN 55413
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America

Search Institute
615 First Avenue Northeast
Suite 125
Minneapolis, MN 55413
United States of America
Document: PDF
Type: Program/Project Evaluation
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This study was designed to investigate the nature and quality of actual mentoring relationships and the processes used to establish and support such relationships.
Abstract: The study looked at five types of mentoring programs: traditional, long-term focused activities, short-term focused activities, team mentoring, and group mentoring. A review of the literature about mentoring and discussions with various individuals provided the basis for the mentoring typology that guided the study. Interviews conducted with mentors and mentees revealed several ingredients of successful mentoring programs: (1) appropriate screening, matching, and training; (2) adequate support and communication structures; (3) opportunities for social activities; (4) good match between mentor expectations and program goals; and (5) appropriate communication with the mentor's family. The study found that expanding the definition and understanding of mentoring to include a range of mentoring opportunities presents new options for volunteers. Adults can choose a program that fits their preference for relationship type and length of commitment. Some adults may choose to become involved in long-term relationships with young people, while others may opt for short-term, less intense personal commitments.
Main Term(s): Juveniles
Index Term(s): Interpersonal relations; Juvenile delinquency prevention programs; Mentoring programs; Youth development
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=152878

*A link to the full-text document is provided whenever possible. For documents not available online, a link to the publisher's website is provided. Tell us how you use the NCJRS Library and Abstracts Database - send us your feedback.