skip navigation

PUBLICATIONS

Register for Latest Research

Stay Informed
Register with NCJRS to receive NCJRS's biweekly e-newsletter JUSTINFO and additional periodic emails from NCJRS and the NCJRS federal sponsors that highlight the latest research published or sponsored by the Office of Justice Programs.

NCJRS Abstract

The document referenced below is part of the NCJRS Virtual Library collection. To conduct further searches of the collection, visit the Virtual Library. See the Obtain Documents page for direction on how to access resources online, via mail, through interlibrary loans, or in a local library.

 

NCJ Number: 153387 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: Extension of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974 (P.L. 93-415)
Corporate Author: US Congress
Senate Subcommittee to Investigate Juvenile Delinquency
United States of America
Date Published: 1977
Page Count: 233
Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
Superintendent of Documents
Washington, DC 20402
US Congress
Washington, DC 20510
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America

Superintendent of Documents
Congressional Sales Office GPO
Washington, DC 20402
United States of America
Document: PDF
Type: Legislative Hearing/Committee Report
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: The U.S. Senate Subcommittee To Investigate Juvenile Delinquency met in 1977 to consider several amendments to the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974.
Abstract: After two years of working under the Act, Department of Justice representatives gave a generally favorable report. The first of the two amendments considered during this hearing was the reauthorization provision which would extend the Act another three years through fiscal 1980. The reauthorization period would allow work to be continued in the field of juvenile delinquency treatment and prevention and would reassure State and local governments, as well as private agencies, of the Federal Government's commitment to the program. The second amendment concerned the rate at which States were complying with the Act's requirement to deinstitutionalize juvenile status offenders and would allow continued Federal funding for those States that showed an unequivocal commitment to achieving this objective, even if they could not meet the 2-year deadline mandated by the Act. The hearing consisted of statements by Congressmen, representatives of Federal agencies, a spokesman for the National Council of State Legislatures, and representatives of national and local child advocacy groups.
Main Term(s): Juveniles
Index Term(s): Criminology; Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act; Legislative impact; US Senate
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=153387

*A link to the full-text document is provided whenever possible. For documents not available online, a link to the publisher's website is provided. Tell us how you use the NCJRS Library and Abstracts Database - send us your feedback.