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NCJRS Abstract

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NCJ Number: 154383 Find in a Library
Title: Drug Legalization: Pro and Con
Author(s): H L Hogan
Corporate Author: Library of Congress
Federal Research Division
United States of America
Date Published: 1988
Page Count: 19
Sponsoring Agency: Library of Congress
Washington, DC 20540
National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

Library of Congress
Federal Research Division
101 Independence Ave, SE
Washington, DC 20540
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America
Document: PDF|PDF
Type: Legislation/Policy Analysis
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This paper presents arguments for and against the legalization of drugs whose use and trafficking is currently criminalized.
Abstract: Concern and frustration over the continuing national drug problem have generated a revival of calls to eliminate some or all of the Federal and State restrictions on selected drugs subject to widespread abuse. Proponents of such a course may have widely differing strategies in arguing their cases, but they have in common the notion that the corrupting effects of the illicit drug industry are so threatening to society, in the United States and in the principal producing and transiting countries, that something must be done to take the profit out of drugs. Opponents of drug legalization generally argue that legalization would bring increased drug use, accompanied by a further erosion of the values upon which the Nation's stability rests. Although the term "legalization" is used in a number of ways, those who recommend it as a way of taking the profit out of drug trafficking are assumed to be thinking of an over-the-counter mode of distribution. Schemes for making such a drug as heroin legally available only to persons already addicted -- in controlled, perhaps government-operated maintenance programs -- compose a separate issue, which is not specifically addressed by the arguments in this report. 27 footnotes
Main Term(s): Drug Policy
Index Term(s): Drug legalization; Drug regulation
Note: DCC
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=154383

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