skip navigation

PUBLICATIONS

Register for Latest Research

Stay Informed
Register with NCJRS to receive NCJRS's biweekly e-newsletter JUSTINFO and additional periodic emails from NCJRS and the NCJRS federal sponsors that highlight the latest research published or sponsored by the Office of Justice Programs.

NCJRS Abstract

The document referenced below is part of the NCJRS Virtual Library collection. To conduct further searches of the collection, visit the Virtual Library. See the Obtain Documents page for direction on how to access resources online, via mail, through interlibrary loans, or in a local library.

 

NCJ Number: 156412 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: Vulnerability Assessment of Federal Facilities
Corporate Author: US Dept of Justice
US Marshals Service
United States of America
Date Published: 1995
Page Count: 89
Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
US Dept of Justice
Arlington, VA 22202
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America

US Dept of Justice
US Marshals Service
600 Army Navy Drive
Arlington, VA 22202
United States of America
Document: PDF
Type: Report (Study/Research)
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: Based on a study coordinated by the U.S. Marshals Service, this report presents recommended minimum-security standards for Federal facilities and findings from a survey of existing security conditions at Federal buildings.
Abstract: The Standards Committee consisted of security specialists and representatives of components of the U.S. Department of Justice. The Committee identified and evaluated the various types of security measures that could be used to counter potential vulnerabilities. The product of the Committee's work was a set of minimum standards that can be applied to various Federal facilities. Standards cover perimeter security, entry, interior security, and security planning. Because of the considerable differences among Federal facilities and their security needs, the Committee divided Federal holdings into five security levels to determine which minimum standards are appropriate for which security levels. These categories are based on such factors as size, number of employees, use, and required access to the public. The security survey of Federal facilities was conducted by deputies of the U.S. Marshals Services and security specialists with the General Services Administration. Site visits were conducted to obtain information on facilities based on a security questionnaire. The principal conclusion from the survey is that the typical Federal facility at each security level lacks some of the elements required to meet the new minimum standards proposed in this study. The primary recommendation is that, where feasible, each Federal facility should be brought up to the minimum security standards proposed for its security level. A list of priority recommendations and a proposed time table for their implementation are presented in this report. Appended sample of profile, compilation of survey results, cost matrix, and details of recommended security standards
Main Term(s): Crime prevention measures
Index Term(s): Counter-terrorism tactics; Criminology; Facility security; Federal government; Security surveys
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=156412

*A link to the full-text document is provided whenever possible. For documents not available online, a link to the publisher's website is provided. Tell us how you use the NCJRS Library and Abstracts Database - send us your feedback.