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NCJ Number: 156440 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: Urban Voices: American Discourses on Crime
Author(s): T Sasson
Date Published: 1994
Page Count: 290
Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice (NIJ)
Washington, DC 20531
National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
National Institute of Justice/NCJRS
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
US Dept of Justice NIJ Pub
Washington, DC 20531
Grant Number: 93-IJ-CX-0005
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/NCJRS
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America
Document: PDF
Type: Issue Overview
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This dissertation attempts to determine what ordinary Americans think about crime and its remedies, and the significance of the prominent place crime occupies in American public life.
Abstract: This study is informed by the constructionist approach to political discourse and public opinion. The approach rests on three basic assumptions: (1) Regular people should not be regarded as passive recipients of media messages, but as active assemblers of meaning; (2) Meaning construction through the work of framing occurs in various forms, including academic journals, the mass media, and everyday conversation, and these should be treated as discrete cultural systems each with its own norms and vocabularies and each deserving of study in its own right; and (3) Political conflicts on particular issues are fought out as symbolic contests between contesting frames. In the eight chapters of this study the author identifies the crime frames and discusses the study's discourse samples and methodology describes the frames' performances in the samples of popular and public discourse, and attempts to explain why certain frames performed well while others did not. The author suggests that three principles reducing the scope of the criminal justice system, reducing social and economic inequalities, and fostering community solidarity and empowerment must inform any serious effort to create a safer society. Footnotes, figures, tables, appendixes, bibliography
Main Term(s): Criminology
Index Term(s): Community policing; Crime prevention measures; Criminal justice system reform; Drug legalization; Juveniles; Media coverage; Police; Public Opinion of Crime; Statistics; Victims of Crime
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=156440

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