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NCJ Number: 156538 Find in a Library
Title: Analysis of the Supreme Court's Workload
Journal: Special Report  Volume:2  Issue:1  Dated:(March 1994)  Pages:complete issue
Corporate Author: Administrative Office of the Courts, Judicial Council of California
United States of America
Date Published: 1994
Page Count: 8
Sponsoring Agency: Administrative Office of the Courts, Judicial Council of California
San Francisco, CA 94107
National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America
Document: PDF
Type: Survey
Format: Article
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This study reveals that the California Supreme Court currently analyzes a substantially greater number of issues than it did between 1970 and 1986.
Abstract: Measuring productivity solely by counting opinions filed each year is inaccurate and misleading because the raw number of opinions does not reflect the number of issues analyzed by the court in a given year. An appropriate measure of the court's productivity should consider two factors often overlooked in simply counting the number of opinions: (1) the number of issues analyzed in court opinions; and (2) the court's discharge of nonopinion responsibilities. The California Supreme Court currently analyzes about 50 percent more legal issues than it did between 1970 and 1986 and over 50 percent more legal issues than the U.S. Supreme Court. An average opinion in a capital case analyzes over three times more issues than an average opinion in all other cases, while an average opinion affirming a capital case analyzes almost four times more issues than an average opinion in all other cases. Between 1988 and 1994, the number of petitions resolved by the court increased by about 28 percent. It is recommended that future studies of appellate court productivity focus on factors beyond the raw number of opinions filed. 13 notes and 11 figures
Main Term(s): State supreme courts
Index Term(s): California; Court case flow; Court statistics
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=156538

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