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NCJ Number: 156549 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: Recidivism Among Federal Prison Releasees in 1987: A Preliminary Report
Author(s): M D Harer
Date Published: 1994
Page Count: 99
Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
US Dept of Justice
Washington, DC 20534
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

US Dept of Justice
Federal Bureau of Prisons Office of Research
NALC Building, Room 202
320 First Street, NW
Washington, DC 20534
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America
Document: PDF
Type: Survey
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This study examined recidivism among 1970-1987 Federal prison release cohorts by looking at the association between preprison, prison, and postrelease characteristics and experiences.
Abstract: Multivariate statistical analysis techniques were employed to test hypotheses about the normalizing effects of social furloughs and education programs; to review independent effects of individual characteristics, prison experiences, and postrelease living arrangements; to examine the effectiveness of drug and alcohol treatment programs; to predict recidivism frequency; and to assess the effects of halfway house release on postrelease employment. Study findings demonstrated that, within 3 years of release from the Federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP), 40.8 percent of former inmates had been rearrested or had their parole revoked. Recidivism rates were highest during the first year back in the community; 11.3 percent of released prisoners recidivated in the first 6 months and 20.3 percent did so in the first year after release. Recidivism rates were higher among blacks and Hispanics than among whites and non-Hispanics; 58.8 percent of black releasees recidivated compared to 33.5 percent of whites, and 45.2 percent of Hispanics recidivated compared to 40.2 percent of non-Hispanics. Recidivism rates were almost the same for males and females; 40.9 percent of males recidivated compared to 39.7 percent of females. Among offense types, fraud and drug trafficking offenders had the lowest recidivism rates, while offenders who committed robbery or other crimes against persons had the highest recidivism rates. Recidivism rates were higher among persons with a preprison history of drug or alcohol dependency, were directly related to prison misconduct, were inversely related to educational program participation while in prison, and were lower among inmates who received social furloughs while in prison than among those who did not. Inmates released through a halfway house had a recidivism rate of 31.1 percent, compared to a rate of 51.1 percent for those released directly from prison. Policy implications of the study findings are discussed, and recommendations for future recidivism research are offered. Appendixes contain supplemental information on BOP policies and programs and drug abuse by Federal prisoners. 97 references and 29 tables
Main Term(s): Corrections statistics
Index Term(s): Black/African Americans; Black/White Crime Comparisons; Caucasian/White Americans; Crime patterns; Federal Bureau of Prisons; Federal prisoners; Hispanic Americans; Inmate statistics; Offender statistics; Parole violations; Recidivism statistics
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=156549

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