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NCJ Number: 156639 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: Drug Use by High School Seniors: Class of 1986
Corporate Author: National Institute on Drug Abuse
United States of America
Date Published: 1987
Page Count: 40
Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
National Institute on Drug Abuse
Bethesda, MD 20892-9561
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

National Institute on Drug Abuse
National Institutes of Health
6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 5213
Bethesda, MD 20892-9561
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America
Type: Statistics
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This report presents statistics on drug use among high school seniors nationwide from the classes of 1975 through 1986.
Abstract: The statistics for 1986 show that illicit drug use among high school seniors declined, following a trend documented the previous year; 58 percent indicated some experience with illicit drugs and 27 reported current drug use, compared to 61 percent and 30 percent, respectively, in 1985. The statistics showed the continuation of a 6-year downward trend in marijuana use. However, high school seniors in 1986 continued to use cocaine at the same level as the previous year, approximately 17 percent. In addition, 4.1 percent of respondents had used crack during the past year. The proportion of seniors who said they were dependent on cocaine doubled from 0.4 percent in 1983 to 0.8 percent in 1986. Lifetime prevalence rates for use of PCP, LSD, and heroin remained unchanged from 1985 figures. Nearly two-thirds of the students reported drinking alcohol within the previous 30 days. Cigarette smoking, which declined several years ago, remained stable. 34 tables
Main Term(s): Juvenile drug use
Index Term(s): Cocaine; Marijuana; Trend analysis
Note: DCC
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http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=156639

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