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NCJRS Abstract

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NCJ Number: 156648 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: Internal Controls: Drug Enforcement Administration's Use of Forfeited Personal Property
Corporate Author: US Government Accountability Office
General Government Division
United States of America
Date Published: 1986
Page Count: 13
Sponsoring Agency: Azimuth Inc.
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National Institute of Justice/
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US Government Accountability Office
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Publication Number: GAO/GGD-87-20
Sale Source: Azimuth Inc.
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Type: Survey
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: The U.S. General Accounting Office (GAO) evaluated the adequacy of controls governing the conversion of forfeited personal property to government use, specifically focusing on the degree to which the Dallas field division office of the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) adhered to agency guidelines.
Abstract: The GAO found that furniture and various household goods seized by the Dallas DEA office in September 1985 were converted to government use in April 1986. The key concept in DEA's existing policy on converting forfeited personal property was whether it had operational value. However, this term was not defined clearly, and DEA guidelines made no reference to the types of forfeitable personal property or specific uses that are acceptable. DEA also did not require field managers to justify the need for personal property that was being converted to government use, nor were the conversions reviewed by higher level officials for acceptability. In September 1986, the DEA issued interim instructions for converting forfeited personal property to government use; these instructions required field managers to provide written justifications for all conversions, to obtain Headquarters Property Management Unit approval before seized property is put into use, and to dispose of all items which are not property justified for conversion. 3 figures, 3 notes, and 1 appendix
Main Term(s): Drug law enforcement
Index Term(s): Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA); Forfeiture; US Government Accountability Office (GAO)
Note: DCC
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http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=156648

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