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NCJRS Abstract

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NCJ Number: 156758 Find in a Library
Title: Volunteer Augmentation of the Cincinnati Police Division
Author(s): S R Kramer
Corporate Author: Cincinnati Division of Police
United States of America
Date Published: Unknown
Page Count: 42
Sponsoring Agency: Cincinnati Division of Police
Cincinnati, OH 45214
National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
Sale Source: Cincinnati Division of Police
310 Ezzard Charles Drive
Cincinnati, OH 45214
United States of America

National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America
Document: PDF
Type: Survey
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: An analysis of the use of volunteers by county governments was used to assess whether and how the Cincinnati Police Division could use volunteers to help cope with increasing workloads in a period of restricted funding.
Abstract: The analysis revealed that other public and private agencies have long used volunteers to supplement their output. Four types of volunteer programs for law enforcement agencies were identified. Internal volunteers work in agency offices and facilities to fill in or augment staff functions. External volunteers work outside the agency, performing mostly expert functions similar to their occupations. Community volunteers are typified by block watchers and citizen patrols. Auxiliary police officers are fully authorized officers who work on weekend nights, at special events, and other times and places where additional personnel are needed. Factors involved in the use of volunteers include executive commitment, needs assessment, the roles of volunteers, benefits, organizational placement, costs, union concerns, legalities, confidentiality, security, staff acceptance, and common assumptions about volunteers. Management factors include changed policies and procedures, office space and equipment, transportation, parking, and volunteer recruitment and supervision. A task force is recommended to address these issues in Cincinnati. Appended lists of volunteers and related information, and 35 references (Author abstract modified)
Main Term(s): Police department volunteers
Index Term(s): Ohio; Police volunteer training; Volunteer programs
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=156758

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