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NCJRS Abstract

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NCJ Number: 157037 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: Southeast Asian Population and Police Service Delivery by the Year 2004
Author(s): M W Herder
Date Published: 1995
Page Count: 125
Sponsoring Agency: California Cmssn on Peace Officer Standards and Training
Sacramento, CA 95816
National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
POST Media Distribution Ctr
Sacramento, CA 95816
Publication Number: 20-0410
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/
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United States of America

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Document: PDF
Type: Issue Overview
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This Command College Independent Study Project is a futures study of a particular emerging issue in law enforcement. The paper is intended to project possible scenarios for strategic planning consideration.
Abstract: The author examines the future of police service delivery relating to the Southeast Asian community and provides an overview of current Southeast Asian demographics in the United States and California. The study includes a model strategy for implementing neighborhood police facilities in Southeast Asian neighborhoods, future state scenarios that include a transition management plan and a management model for conducting cultural awareness training for law enforcement personnel. As part of his effort to envision future methods for delivering police services, the author reviews past efforts, specifically preventive patrol and rapid response. By the 1990s, police departments had moved away from those traditional polices and began adopting and implementing community-oriented policing. The author defines community-oriented policing in part as a philosophy which recognizes the interdependence and shared responsibility of the police and the community to build a safe and more livable environment. As a method of policing, it encourages the development of public/private partnerships whose members identify community safety issues, determine available resources, and develop and apply innovative strategies to create and sustain healthy, vital neighborhoods. It reflects the values of: (1) community participation in decision making; (2) police accountability; and (3) deployment of police personnel at a level closer to the people in the neighborhood. Tables, figures, references
Main Term(s): Police
Index Term(s): California; Community policing; Cross-cultural training; Immigrants/Aliens; Neighborhood network centers; Police attitudes; Police training; Police-citizen interactions; Policing innovation
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=157037

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