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NCJ Number: 157082 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: Budget 2001, Working Paper, Government Spending Study: Criminal Justice
Author(s): R Lewis
Corporate Author: Minnesota Criminal Justice Statistical Analysis Ctr
State Planning Agency
United States of America
Date Published: 1995
Page Count: 149
Sponsoring Agency: Minnesota Criminal Justice Statistical Analysis Ctr
St. Paul, MN 55155
National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America

Minnesota Criminal Justice Statistical Analysis Ctr
State Planning Agency
658 Cedar Avenue
St. Paul, MN 55155
United States of America
Document: PDF
Type: Survey
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This paper examines the relationship between policy, workloads, and spending in the criminal justice system in Minnesota and used past trends to project future justice costs and workloads such as reported offenses, cases filed, and inmates.
Abstract: The analysis revealed that increased spending on the Minnesota justice system over the last decade has not reduced crime or fear of crime. Justice is an increasing fiscal problem for cities, counties, and the State, costing taxpayers more than $1 billion per year. From 1985 to 1992, total justice spending was among the fastest growing government services provided to citizens. Spending on corrections has resulted more from increases in prosecution and sentencing than by increases in reported crime and arrests. Moreover, police officers, the courts, and corrections officials cannot, by themselves, reduce crime significantly. Justice responsibilities are dispersed among many different city, county, and State agencies that police, adjudicate charges, and administer correctional programs. Furthermore, more than 9 of every 10 criminal offenders are on probation rather than incarcerated. Figures, tables, and appended summary of major Minnesota law changes from 1973 to 1994
Main Term(s): Funding sources
Index Term(s): Cost/Benefit Analysis; Criminal justice employment/expenditure data; Minnesota
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=157082

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