skip navigation

PUBLICATIONS

Register for Latest Research

Stay Informed
Register with NCJRS to receive NCJRS's biweekly e-newsletter JUSTINFO and additional periodic emails from NCJRS and the NCJRS federal sponsors that highlight the latest research published or sponsored by the Office of Justice Programs.

NCJRS Abstract

The document referenced below is part of the NCJRS Virtual Library collection. To conduct further searches of the collection, visit the Virtual Library. See the Obtain Documents page for direction on how to access resources online, via mail, through interlibrary loans, or in a local library.

 

NCJ Number: 157160 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: Pepper Spray Evaluation Project: Results of the Introduction of Oleoresin Capsicum (OC) Into the Baltimore, Maryland, Police Department Final Report
Corporate Author: International Assoc of Chiefs of Police
United States of America
Date Published: 1995
Page Count: 126
Sponsoring Agency: International Assoc of Chiefs of Police
Alexandria, VA 22314
National Institute of Justice (NIJ)
Washington, DC 20531
National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
US Dept of Justice NIJ Pub
Washington, DC 20531
Grant Number: 92-IJ-CX-K026
Sale Source: International Assoc of Chiefs of Police
44 Canal Center Plaza, Suite 200
Alexandria, VA 22314
United States of America

National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America
Document: PDF
Type: Program/Project Evaluation
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This study was designed to evaluate how oleoresin capsicum (OC), or pepper spray, was adopted and implemented by the Baltimore County Police Department, the impact that OC use had on police and subject injuries and brutality/use-of-force complaints, and its effectiveness in subduing physically resistant subjects.
Abstract: During the 9-month evaluation period, OC spray was used by police officers 194 times on either humans or dogs. OC spray was most often used in incidents involving battery, assault, disorderly conduct, domestic violence, and traffic-related incidents. Sixty- two percent of the incidents involving OC spray occurred outdoors. The subjects against whom OC spray was used by police officers were typically male, of medium or large frame size, who were intoxicated, belligerent, or combative. Officers reported that 65 percent of sprayed subjects were submissive and another 15 percent were compliant after the spraying. In 90 percent of the cases, the suspect was sufficiently incapacitated to allow arrest. Compared to data from the previous two years, the number of citizen complaints alleging police use-of-force were lower during the OC spray use period. Similarly, the number of officers assaulted by suspects was lower. 22 figures, 2 tables, 9 notes, 12 references, and 11 appendixes
Main Term(s): Police safety
Index Term(s): Lawful use of force; Maryland; Resisting arrest; Science and Technology
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=157160

*A link to the full-text document is provided whenever possible. For documents not available online, a link to the publisher's website is provided. Tell us how you use the NCJRS Library and Abstracts Database - send us your feedback.