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NCJ Number: 157964 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: Alcohol and Aging
Corporate Author: US Dept of Health and Human Services
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
United States of America
Date Published: 1988
Page Count: 4
Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
US Dept of Health and Human Services
Rockville, MD 20892-9304
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

US Dept of Health and Human Services
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
5635 Fishers Lane, MSC 9304
Rockville, MD 20892-9304
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America
Type: Literature Review
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This paper discusses the prevalence of alcohol abuse among elderly persons, issues in the identification of older alcoholics, and factors to consider when treating the older alcoholic.
Abstract: Although studies of the general population show that the elderly have fewer alcohol-related problems, clinical studies paint a darker picture. Estimates of the percentage of older persons in hospitals or other health care facilities who evidence illness or other serious consequences of alcohol abuse range from 7.5 to 70 percent. Apparently, problems with alcohol do not necessarily decrease with age, and many such problems are not easily identified outside a hospital or other treatment setting. There is continuing evidence of the phenomenon called "late- onset" alcoholism. In a clinical study, at least 41 percent of the people 65 years old and older who were enrolled in a Mayo Clinic alcoholism treatment program reported symptoms of alcoholism that began after age 60. There is evidence that some people may increase their consumption of alcohol as a response to age-related stresses. Once an alcohol problem is identified in an elderly patient, there are special issues to consider; there is an increased risk for drug interactions, since older alcoholics have a high incidence of illnesses and problems not caused by alcohol and which require medication. Even though alcohol abuse or alcoholism may be more difficult to diagnose in older patients, it is worth the additional effort to identify and treat them. 23 references
Main Term(s): Drug abuse
Index Term(s): Alcohol abuse; Alcoholism detection; Older Adults (65+)
Note: From Alcohol Alert No. 2, October 1988.
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=157964

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