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NCJ Number: 157967 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: Alcoholism and Co-occurring Disorders
Corporate Author: US Dept of Health and Human Services
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
United States of America
Date Published: 1991
Page Count: 4
Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
US Dept of Health and Human Services
Rockville, MD 20892-9304
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

US Dept of Health and Human Services
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
5635 Fishers Lane, MSC 9304
Rockville, MD 20892-9304
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America
Type: Literature Review
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This paper identifies medical disorders that co-occur with alcoholism.
Abstract: Alcoholism and other disorders might be related in a number of ways; alcoholism and a second disorder can co-occur, either sequentially or simultaneously, by coincidence; alcoholism can cause various medical and psychiatric conditions or increase their severity; comorbid disorders might cause alcoholism or increase its severity; both alcoholism and the comorbid disorder may be caused separately by some third condition; and alcohol use or alcohol withdrawal can produce symptoms that mimic those of an independent psychiatric disorder. Alcohol has been shown to be directly toxic to the liver. Approximately 90 to 100 percent of heavy drinkers show evidence of fatty liver, an estimated 10 to 35 percent develop alcoholic hepatitis, and 10 to 20 percent develop cirrhosis. Alcohol can damage the brain in many ways, and additional diseases linked to alcohol consumption include failure of reproductive function and cancers of the mouth, larynx, and esophagus. Psychiatric disorders related to chronic alcohol consumption are antisocial personality disorder, bulimia, depression, and anxiety. Alcoholics are also at higher risk for other drug abuse associated with injurious effects. 33 references
Main Term(s): Drug effects
Index Term(s): Alcohol abuse; Alcohol abuse education; Drug information
Note: From Alcohol Alert No. 14, October 1991.
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=157967

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