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NCJ Number: 157974 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: Alcohol-Medication Interactions
Corporate Author: US Dept of Health and Human Services
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
United States of America
Date Published: 1995
Page Count: 4
Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
US Dept of Health and Human Services
Rockville, MD 20892-9304
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

US Dept of Health and Human Services
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
5635 Fishers Lane, MSC 9304
Rockville, MD 20892-9304
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America
Type: Literature Review
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This paper examines the prevalence of alcohol-drug interactions, how alcohol and drugs interact, and some specific interactions.
Abstract: Many medications can interact with alcohol, leading to increased risk of illness, injury, or death. The prevalent use of both drug and alcohol suggest that some concurrent use of alcohol and medications is inevitable. The elderly may be especially likely to mix drugs and alcohol and are at particular risk of the adverse consequences of such combinations. Alcohol can influence the effectiveness of a drug by altering its availability. First, an acute dose of alcohol may inhibit a drug's metabolism by competing with the drug for the same set of metabolizing enzymes. Second, chronic alcohol ingestion may activate drug-metabolizing enzymes, thus decreasing the drug's availability and diminishing its effects. This paper discusses how chronic alcohol consumption interacts with the following drug classes: anesthetics, antibiotics, anticoagulants, antidepressants, antidiabetic medications, antihistamines, antipsychotic medications, antiseizure medications, antiulcer medications, cardiovascular medications, narcotic pain relievers, nonnarcotic pain relievers, and sedatives and hypnotics. 39 references
Main Term(s): Drug effects
Index Term(s): Alcohol abuse; Alcohol abuse education; Alcoholism
Note: From Alcohol Alert No. 27, January 1995.
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=157974

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