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NCJRS Abstract

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NCJ Number: 164492 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: Remarks at the Corrections Technology Conference
Author(s): J Travis
Corporate Author: National Institute of Justice (NIJ)
US Department of Justice
Office of Justice Programs
United States of America
Date Published: 1996
Page Count: 6
Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice (NIJ)
Washington, DC 20531
National Institute of Justice/NCJRS
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
US Dept of Justice NIJ Pub
Washington, DC 20531
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/NCJRS
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America
Type: Conference Material
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: The Director of the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) spoke at the 1996 Corrections Technology Conference in Charleston, South Carolina, about the role of the NIJ in corrections and sentencing.
Abstract: He noted that corrections and sentencing are at a critical juncture due to significant increases in prison populations. About 500,000 Americans were incarcerated in 1980, and this figure increased to 1.5 million by 1995. The population under correctional supervision totaled 1.8 million in 1980, and this figure is projected to increase to 6 million in 1997. At the State level, demands of corrections budgets are competing with demands for higher education. In addition, the mix of prisoners is changing, with more violent inmates, more inmates with health problems, and more inmates with divergent cultural backgrounds. The NIJ values the work of professionals who operate prisons and jails and who administer probation and parole agencies and also places a high priority on sentencing issues. Priority NIJ initiatives include tuberculosis and HIV in correctional facilities, boot camps, correctional health care, drug treatment, drug testing, risk classification systems for probationers, the role of the business sector in providing inmates with employment opportunities, restorative justice programs, three strikes legislation, and hair and urine testing for drug abuse.
Main Term(s): Corrections trends
Index Term(s): Corrections management; Corrections statistics; Inmate characteristics; Inmate statistics; National Institute of Justice (NIJ); Science and Technology; Sentencing/Sanctions
Note: Presented at the Corrections Technology Conference, 1996, Charleston, South Carolina
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=164492

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