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NCJ Number: NCJ 167327     Find in a Library
Title: Single-Parent Families Cause Juvenile Crime (From Juvenile Crime: Opposing Viewpoints, P 62-66, 1997, A E Sadler, ed. -- See NCJ-167319)
Author(s): R L Maginnis
Date Published: 1997
Page Count: 5
Sale Source: Greenhaven Press
P.O. Box 9187
Farmington Hills, MI 48333-9187
United States of America
Type: Issue Overview
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: Children from single-parent families are more likely to have behavioral problems because they tend to lack economic security and adequate time with parents.
Abstract: The Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency reports that the most reliable indicator of violent crime in a community is the proportion of fatherless families. Fathers typically offer economic stability, a role model for boys, greater household security, and reduced stress for mothers. This is especially true for families with adolescent boys, the most crime-prone cohort. Children from single-parent families are more prone than children from two-parent families to use drugs, be gang members, be expelled from school, be committed to reform institutions, and become juvenile murderers. Single parenthood inevitably reduces the amount of time a child has in interaction with someone who is attentive to the child's needs, including the provision of moral guidance and discipline. According to a 1993 Metropolitan Life Survey, "Violence in America's Public Schools," 71 percent of teachers and 90 percent of law enforcement officials state that the lack of parental supervision at home is a major factor that contributes to the violence in schools. Sixty-one percent of elementary students and 76 percent of secondary children agree with this assessment.
Main Term(s): Juvenile delinquent family relations
Index Term(s): Juvenile delinquency factors ; Parent-Child Relations ; Parental influence
   
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https://www.ncjrs.gov/App/Publications/abstract.aspx?ID=167327

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