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NCJ Number: 168573 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: Exploring the Recent Surge in Youth Homicide Rates: Geographic Variations (From Nature of Homicide: Trends and Changes - Proceedings of the 1996 Meeting of the Homicide Research Working Group, Santa Monica, California, P 58-62, 1996, Pamela K Lattimore and Cynthia A Nahabedian, eds. - See NCJ- 16614
Author(s): R L Flewelling
Date Published: 1996
Page Count: 5
Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice (NIJ)
Washington, DC 20531
National Institute of Justice/NCJRS
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
US Dept of Justice NIJ Pub
Washington, DC 20531
Grant Number: 95-IJ-CX-0114
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/NCJRS
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America
Type: Survey
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This study was initiated to examine patterns and trends in youth homicide victimization rates in the United States between 1980 and 1992 using data obtained from the Federal Bureau of Investigation's Supplemental Homicide Report data files and annual age-specific population estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau.
Abstract: The study focused on homicide victimization rates for young people between 15 and 19 years of age. A mathematical model was used to estimate the homicide rate as a quadratic function of year, and model-estimated values of the homicide rate over time were then employed to define trend characteristics such as the year of onset in the increase and the proportionate increase in the homicide rate since the estimated date of onset. Results showed all States included in the study experienced an increase in the youth homicide victimization rate. There was considerable variability across States, however, in the magnitude of this increase. Further analysis is recommended to explore and describe variations among States and metropolitan areas and to identify sociodemographic, economic, and public policy variables associated with these variations. 3 figures
Main Term(s): Criminology
Index Term(s): Geographic distribution of crime; Homicide trends; Homicide victims; Juvenile offender statistics; Juvenile victims; NIJ grant-related documents; United States of America; Victims of violent crime; Violent crime statistics; Violent juvenile offenders
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