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NCJ Number: 168589 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: Pediatric Firearm Mortality Rates in Chicago (From Nature of Homicide: Trends and Changes - Proceedings of the 1996 Meeting of the Homicide Research Working Group, P 216-218, 1996, Pamela K Lattimore and Cynthia A Nahabedian, eds. - See NCJ-166149)
Author(s): R R Tanz; C Georgakis
Corporate Author: National Institute of Justice (NIJ)
US Department of Justice
Office of Justice Programs
United States of America

US Dept of Justice NIJ Pub
United States of America
Date Published: 1996
Page Count: 3
Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice (NIJ)
Washington, DC 20531
National Institute of Justice/NCJRS
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
US Dept of Justice NIJ Pub
Washington, DC 20531
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/NCJRS
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America
Type: Survey
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: Since 1980, Chicago has experienced an increase in the number and rate of pediatric firearm deaths; all age groups are affected, but older adolescents are driving the trend.
Abstract: Between 1980 and 1994, annual pediatric firearm deaths in Chicago increased from 116 to 247, a 200-percent increase in 14 years. The number of deaths remained relatively stable between 1980 and 1987 but increased dramatically between 1987 and 1994. The largest 1-year increase occurred from 1989 to 1990. During the 1992-1994 period, pediatric firearm deaths rose by an average of 8.3 percent per year. The firearm death rate for children up to 19 years of age was 12 per 100,000 in 1980 and 30.5 per 100,000 in 1994. Adolescents accounted for 83 to 93 percent of pediatric firearm deaths each year between 1980 and 1994. The number of male deaths surpassed female deaths in all years, black males were 20.1 times more likely than white males to die from gunfire, and the most common cause of death for Chicago teenagers in the 1990s was a gunshot wound. 2 references and 1 table
Main Term(s): Violent crime statistics
Index Term(s): Black/White Crime Comparisons; Child fatalities; Child victims; Criminology; Female victims; Firearm-crime relationships; Firearms deaths; Homicide trends; Homicide victims; Illinois; Juvenile victims; Male survivors; Urban criminality; Victims of violent crime; Weapons violations
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