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NCJ Number: 169406 Find in a Library
Title: Homicide Followed by Suicide: An Analysis of Chicago Data
Journal: Criminology  Volume:35  Issue:3  Dated:(August 1997)  Pages:435-453
Author(s): S Stack
Date Published: 1997
Page Count: 19
Type: Report (Study/Research)
Format: Article
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This study tests the thesis that the closer the ties between offender and victim in a homicide, the greater the ensuing guilt and the greater the likelihood of suicide.
Abstract: Homicide followed by suicide has been a neglected area in criminological theory and research. Also, available work is marked by a series of methodological limitations, such as small samples and lack of systematic multivariate analysis. This study analyzes data on 16,245 homicides in Chicago. A multivariate logistic regression analysis largely confirms the thesis that the closer the ties between offender and victim in a homicide, the greater the ensuing guilt and the greater the likelihood of suicide. Controlling for sociodemographic variables, killing an ex-spouse/lover increased the risk of suicide the most, 12.68 times. The odds of suicide are increased 10.28 times for killing a child, 8.00 times for killing a spouse, 6.11 times for killing a girlfriend or boyfriend, and 1.88 times for killing a friend. The act of homicide-suicide is conceptualized as stemming from a frustrated intimate relationship and a blend of self- and other-blame in one's attribution style. Notes, tables, appendix, references
Main Term(s): Criminology
Index Term(s): Behavioral science research; Crime patterns; Criminology theory evaluation; Homicide; Homicide victims; Regression analysis; Statistical analysis; Statistics; Suicide; Suicide causes
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=169406

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