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NCJ Number: 169530 Find in a Library
Title: Supply Side Imprisonment Policy
Author(s): M K Block
Corporate Author: National Institute of Justice (NIJ)
US Department of Justice
Office of Justice Programs
United States of America

US Dept of Justice NIJ Pub
United States of America
Date Published: 1997
Page Count: 19
Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice (NIJ)
Washington, DC 20531
National Institute of Justice/NCJRS
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
US Dept of Justice NIJ Pub
Washington, DC 20531
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/NCJRS
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America
Document: PDF
Type: Statistics
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This paper discusses the hypothesis that threatening and imposing noticeable prison sentences helps to control crime.
Abstract: The paper claims that there are too many prisoners and prisons in the United States today because sentencing policies, for most of the last half of the 20th century, have not been harsh enough; society has not been willing enough to imprison serious offenders. Research into the relationship between sentencing policy and crime control suggests that: (1) prisoners are much more powerfully deterred from criminal acts by an increase in the likelihood that the penalty will be imposed than by an increase in the severity of the penalty; (2) the quickest and least expensive way to increase the certainty of imprisonment is to change sentencing policy; and (3) sentencing to prison all offenders convicted of violent crime, without the option of probation or jail, would likely be cost-effective, may actually reduce the prison population and will eventually result in fewer arrests and convictions. Tables, notes, bibliography, appendix
Main Term(s): Corrections
Index Term(s): Cost analysis; Crime prevention measures; Criminology; Economic analysis of crime; Prison costs; Public Opinion of Corrections; Sentence effectiveness; Sentencing reform; Statistics
Note: NIJ Research Report. Presentations from the 1996 Annual Research and Evaluation Conference Washington, D.C.
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=169530

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