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NCJ Number: 169872 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: Juvenile Crime in North Carolina: A System Impact Assessment
Author(s): D L Yearwood
Date Published: Unknown
Page Count: 18
Sponsoring Agency: NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
North Carolina Criminal Justice Analysis Ctr
Raleigh, NC 27609
North Carolina Governor's Crime Cmssn
Raleigh, NC 27609
Sale Source: North Carolina Governor's Crime Cmssn
Criminal Justice Analysis Ctr
1201 Front Street, Suite 200
Raleigh, NC 27609
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America

North Carolina Criminal Justice Analysis Ctr
1201 Front Street, Suite 200
Raleigh, NC 27609
United States of America
Type: Survey
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: North Carolina's juvenile arrest rate grew by 27.3 percent between 1988 and 1992 and by 54.4 percent between 1988 and 1994; the arrest rate for violent crime increased by 73.3 percent between 1988 and 1992 and by 97.5 percent between 1988 and 1994, while the arrest rate for property offenses rose by 2.3 percent between 1988 and 1992 and by 8.2 percent between 1988 and 1994.
Abstract: Recognizing causes and correlates of increased juvenile crime in North Carolina included familial factors, demographics and community structure, academic performance and the school environment, and economic indicators, data were collected from several sources, including published annual reports, administrative agency data sets, the Internet, and centralized data repositories, to analyze three variables--juvenile arrests, delinquency petition filings, and training school admission rates. Findings documented a consistent and statistically significant link between the rate of single-parent households and the percentage of the population residing in urban areas with the three variables. The research suggests a need for concentrating fiscal and program resources for prevention and intervention activities on communities with a high rate of single-parent households and a large urban population. Future research is recommended to examine why and how the rate of single-parent households and a large urban population interact to exert a substantial impact on North Carolina's juvenile justice system. 34 references and 2 tables
Main Term(s): Juveniles
Index Term(s): Crime Causes; Economic influences; Juvenile arrest statistics; Juvenile delinquency factors; Juvenile offender statistics; Juvenile offense statistics; North Carolina; Single parent families; Social conditions; Society-crime relationships; Urban criminality; Violent juvenile offenders
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=169872

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