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NCJ Number: 185487 Find in a Library
Title: Violence in Our Schools: A National Crisis (From Violence in American Schools: A Practical Guide for Counselors, P 3-20, 2000, Daya Singh Sandhu and Cheryl Blalock Aspy, eds. -- See NCJ-185486)
Author(s): Donald R. Nims
Date Published: 2000
Page Count: 18
Sponsoring Agency: American Counseling Assoc
Alexandria, VA 22304
Sale Source: American Counseling Assoc
5999 Stevenson Avenue
Alexandria, VA 22304
United States of America
Type: Collected Work
Format: Book (Softbound)
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: There is no doubt that the much publicized recent episodes of violence in schools across the United States have caused school counselors, teachers, and administrators to reflect on the question of whether violence could occur in their schools.
Abstract: Consequently, schools should have both reactive and proactive responses in place to deal with violence. Schools need to be aware of the role of respect and empathy in diffusing violence. Counselors can be leaders by being an example themselves and by training other school staff. Once a crisis occurs, schools should be able to respond to limit both immediate and long-term impacts of violence. In looking at a range of responses in both reactive and proactive postures for school counselors, teachers, and administrators, the author discusses school violence from an epidemiological perspective and school violence as a reflection of society. He covers reactive responses to school violence that focus on crisis response, secure facilities design and management, violence de-escalation strategies, how to stop a fight, weapon removal, gang awareness, uniformed security presence, bullying behavior, and legal implications of school violence. Proactive responses to school violence are concerned with empathy skills, conflict resolution, peer mediation, continuing education programs, peacemaking curriculum, modeling trust and respect, multicultural awareness, and community involvement. 66 references
Main Term(s): Violent juvenile offenders
Index Term(s): Conflict resolution; Counseling techniques; Counselors; Crime in schools; Crisis intervention; Crisis management; Juvenile counseling; Juvenile delinquency prevention; School security; Students; United States of America; Violence prevention
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=185487

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