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NCJ Number: 186885 Find in a Library
Title: Constructing Images of Workplace Homicide
Journal: Western Criminology Review (Online)  Volume:3  Issue:1  Dated:2001  Pages:1-22
Author(s): Ronald Burns
Date Published: 2001
Page Count: 22
Publisher: http://wcr.sonoma.edu 
Type: Report (Study/Research)
Format: Article
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This paper addresses the creation of the societal fear surrounding workplace homicide, emphasizing the media depiction of such events, and assessing the roles played by several groups in the creation of workplace homicide/violence as an increasingly dangerous social problem.
Abstract: The public perception of workplace homicide involves someone known to the workplace taking out their frustrations on innocent workers. Yet, empirical data suggest that such confrontations constitute only a small percentage of workplace homicides. The present research addresses newspaper coverage of homicides in the workplace, providing analyses of workplace homicide “themes” depicted in newspaper accounts, as well as particular characteristics of newspaper portrayals of workplace homicide. It appears that workplace homicide has been largely misinterpreted by society, with several groups benefiting from the misunderstanding. The research suggests the media and all branches of government have abused their power particularly through the use of information management. The media should clearly define, discuss, and/or portray workplace homicide, with the ultimate goal of informing without creating a workplace homicide moral panic. It is important that the misuse of power by these groups be addressed. Efforts to strengthen the consistency, validity, and reliability of workplace homicide statistics are necessary for appropriate responses to the problem. Endnotes, references
Main Term(s): Violence in the workplace
Index Term(s): Media coverage; Moral Panic; Public information; Violence; Violence prediction; Violent crimes
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http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=186885

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