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NCJ Number: 201623 Find in a Library
Title: Characteristics of Homeless Admissions to Substance Abuse Treatment: 2000
Corporate Author: RTI International
United States of America

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Admin (SAMHSA)
US Dept of Health and Human Services
United States of Americ

Synectics for Management Decisions, Inc.
United States of America
Date Published: August 8, 2003
Page Count: 3
Sponsoring Agency: NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
RTI International
Research Triangle Park, NC 27709
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Admin (SAMHSA)
Rockville, MD 20857
Synectics for Management Decisions, Inc.
Arlington, VA 22209
Sale Source: NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Admin (SAMHSA)
US Dept of Health and Human Services
1 Choke Cherry Road
Rockville, MD 20857
United States of America
Document: PDF
Type: Research (Applied/Empirical)
Format: Document
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This report discusses the characteristics of homeless admissions to substance abuse treatment for the year 2000.
Abstract: In 2000, more than 120,000 admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities were homeless at the time of admission. These admissions comprised 10 percent of the admissions for whom living arrangements were recorded. This proportion has remained consistent since 1997. Admissions to treatment facilities are tracked in the Treatment Episode Data Set (TEDS), an annual compilation of data on the demographic characteristics and substance abuse problems of those admitted for substance abuse treatment. Only data on admissions for the 41 States with a response rate of 75 percent or higher on this data element in 2000 were used for this report. Demographic characteristics of the homeless admissions include: 1) the average for homeless admissions was 38 compared to 33 for non-homeless; 2) the proportion of homeless admissions over 45 was 23 percent compared to 15 percent for the non-homeless; 3) 76 percent of the homeless admissions were male; 4) homeless admissions were more likely to be veterans (10 percent vs. 6 percent) than the non-homeless; and 5) homeless admissions were 53 percent White and 30 percent Black compared to non-homeless who were 59 percent White and 24 percent Black. Characteristics of primary substance of abuse for homeless admissions included the following: 1) alcohol was the primary substance of abuse for 51 percent compared to 47 percent for non-homeless; 2) homeless admissions were more likely to be admitted for smoked cocaine abuse (17 percent vs. 10 percent) but less likely for marijuana abuse (5 percent vs. 17 percent); and 3) large differences existed in the distribution of primary substance of abuse by race/ethnicity among the homeless admissions. In addition, 23 percent of homeless admissions reported co-occurring disorders (the co-occurrence of a substance abuse problem and a psychiatric disorder) compared to 20 percent of non-homeless admissions. Other characteristics of homeless admissions included data on source of referral, treatment setting, and prior treatment. 3 figures and 2 tables
Main Term(s): Drug abuse; Drug treatment programs
Index Term(s): Alcoholism treatment programs; Drug treatment; Involuntary treatment; Voluntary treatment
Note: The DASIS Report, August 8, 2003.
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=201623

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