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NCJ Number: 204643 Find in a Library
Title: Drug Use in Frederick County: Overview
Corporate Author: Ctr for Substance Abuse Research (CESAR)
United States of America
Date Published: 2003
Page Count: 6
Sponsoring Agency: Ctr for Substance Abuse Research (CESAR)
College Park, MD 20740
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
Sale Source: NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America

Ctr for Substance Abuse Research (CESAR)
University of Maryland
4321 Hartwick Road
Suite 501
College Park, MD 20740
United States of America
Document: PDF
Type: Report (Study/Research)
Format: Document (Online)
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: Based on data from the Drug Early Warning System (DEWS) in Frederick County (Maryland), which obtains drug-related morbidity and mortality data from a variety of sources, this report presents data on drug use in the county for 2002 and for the period 1998-2002.
Abstract: In 2001, 10th graders in Frederick County were involved in the current use of marijuana, LSD, PCP, methamphetamines, designer drugs, heroin, amphetamines, barbiturates, and narcotics at higher levels than among 12th graders; however, this may reflect the high dropout rates for high school seniors in the county. The percentage of substance-related school suspensions (n=5,566) in the county was approximately 7-percent lower in 2001 than any of the previous 4 years. There were 33 fatal crashes in the county in 2001, and 27 percent were AOD-related (alcohol and other drugs), a greater percentage than any year since 1995. Drug arrests in the county for adults (n=953) and juveniles (n=213) were greater in 2001 than the previous 3 years (1998-2000). Alcohol was the most frequently cited drug of abuse mentioned by county residents (adults and juveniles combined) entering treatment in fiscal year 2002. Among sixth and eighth graders in the county, current binge drinking percentages ranged from 1 percent to 10 percent, respectively. Five percent of sixth graders and 23 percent of 9th graders reported current use of alcohol in 2001. Slightly over 34 percent of 12th graders and 30 percent of 10th graders reported current binge drinking. Marijuana was the second most often cited drug of abuse among county residents admitted to treatment in fiscal year 2002. Youth interviewed at admission to county intake centers reported that marijuana was sometimes laced with other drugs. Cocaine was the third most prevalent substance mentioned by county residents (adults and juveniles) entering treatment in fiscal year 2002, and heroin was the fourth most often cited substance abused by county residents (adults and juveniles combined) in fiscal year 2002. Nearly 12 percent of county juveniles mentioned abuse of hallucinogens on admission to treatment in fiscal year 2002, down from the 17 percent in 1998. Other drug use reported in the county involved designer drugs, amphetamines, barbiturates, PCP, and formaldehyde.
Main Term(s): Drug statistics
Index Term(s): Alcohol abuse; Amphetamines; Cocaine; Drug abuse; Heroin; Juvenile drug abusers; Marijuana; Maryland; MDMA (designer drug); Underage Drinking
Note: Downloaded March 17, 2004.
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http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=204643

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