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NCJ Number: 211269 Find in a Library
Title: Arrest and Intimate Partner Violence: Toward a More Complete Application of Deterrence Theory
Journal: Aggression and Violent Behavior  Volume:10  Issue:6  Dated:September-October 2005  Pages:660-679
Author(s): Kirk R. Williams
Date Published: October 2005
Page Count: 20
Publisher: http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/homepage.cws_home 
Type: Literature Review
Format: Article
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This paper reviews literature and attempts to stimulate further research that tests deterrence and alternative theories of violence prevention, thus enhancing an understanding of how sanctions influence intimate partner violence.
Abstract: Whether arrest policies promote the prevention, cessation, or reduction of intimate partner violence remains an open question. This paper reviews research on arrest and intimate partner violence, documenting mixed findings and contending that it suffers from an insufficiently developed theoretical foundation. The paper presents an analytical framework that integrates deterrence theory, other theoretical perspectives on the preventive effects of sanctions, and factors that may moderate those effects. The goal is to stimulate further research that tests deterrence and alternative theories of violence prevention, thereby enhancing an understanding of how sanctions influence intimate partner violence. Through this review it is suggested that sanctions have a complex connection to human behavior, particularly violent behavior in intimate relationships. An expanded specification of deterrence theory is proposed that builds on previous empirical studies, distinguishes alternative mediating influences of sanctions, and integrates risk assessment as a strategy to estimate the moderating influences on sanction threats and experiences. References
Main Term(s): Violence prevention
Index Term(s): Community crime prevention programs; Deterrence; Deterrence effectiveness; Domestic assault; Literature reviews; Violence
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=232535

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