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NCJ Number: 211597 Find in a Library
Title: National Institute of Justice Helps Facilities Implement Telemedicine Program
Author(s): Ronald J. Waldron
Date Published: 2002
Page Count: 2
Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice (NIJ)
Washington, DC 20531
National Institute of Justice/NCJRS
Rockville, MD 20849
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/NCJRS
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America
Document: PDF
Type: Issue Overview
Format: Document (Online)
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This report describes the National Institute of Justice’s (NIJ’s) two-part demonstration project on telemedicine for correctional facilities.
Abstract: Providing healthcare within correctional facilities can be a challenging task that is lessened by the implementation of telemedicine systems. Telemedicine systems involve the use of interactive video to remotely connect two or more health care providers. An independent evaluation of the 1994 NIJ demonstration project involving the use of telemedicine at several Federal prisons concluded that telemedicine could be a cost-effective method for the provision of inmate healthcare. While telemedicine holds promise for many correctional facilities, these systems are not right for each and every facility. The report describes how to assess whether telemedicine is the correct choice for a particular correctional facility, which includes a medical requirement analysis and an evaluation of telemedicine options. Readers are directed to two NIJ publications for more information about telemedicine and its use in correctional facilities. Figures
Main Term(s): Inmate health care; Telecommunications
Index Term(s): Correctional facilities; Science and Technology
Note: Downloaded October 12, 2005. Reprinted from the April 2002 issue of Corrections Today, Vol. 64, No. 2, with permission from The American Correctional Association.
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=232875

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