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NCJ Number: 220132 Find in a Library
Title: Snowflake Children
Journal: Child and Youth Services  Volume:29  Issue:1/2  Dated:2007  Pages:1-27
Author(s): Niall McElwee
Date Published: 2007
Page Count: 27
Publisher: http://www.haworthpressinc.com/ 
Type: Report (Study/Research)
Format: Article
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This article explores the dynamics of Irish families within the context of Ireland emerging from a history of neglect towards vulnerable populations of at-risk children and youth.
Abstract: A significant percentage of the difficulties being experienced in schools at the start of the 21st century is largely connected with the very significant changes the Irish family is undergoing, hence the concentration on exploring the dynamics of families. Prior research argues that while locating the primary source of distress within the family, there has been a failure to identify the ecological embeddedness of families in the larger society. Separating at-risk children from their family and community environment and then expecting them to perform and succeed in formal school examinations is fraught with problems as predicting potential success and failure is much more subtle, complex process. Taking account of the needs and views of children is problematic, particularly in Ireland where children have been “owned” by their parents and social policy has been directed at the family rather than the individual child. This article reviews new pathways for analysis being created in relation to youth at-risk in the Irish context. References
Main Term(s): Children at risk
Index Term(s): Adolescents at risk; Cultural influences; Family histories; Family structure; Ireland; Parent-Child Relations; Sociology
Note: Special issue on At-Risk Children and Youth: Resiliency Explored, for related articles see NCJ-220133-141.
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http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=241931

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