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NCJ Number: 221691 Find in a Library
Title: Mental Illness in Offender Populations: Prevalence, Duty and Implications
Journal: Journal of Offender Rehabilitation  Volume:45  Issue:1/2  Dated:2007  Pages:1-17
Author(s): Irina R. Soderstrom
Date Published: 2007
Page Count: 17
Publisher: http://www.haworthpressinc.com/ 
Type: Issue Overview
Format: Article
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This study examined the prevalence of mental illness in American jails and prisons, the duty government and society has to provide appropriate mental health treatment, and the implications for inmate safety, costs, recidivism, and community reintegration without the provision of mental health treatment.
Abstract: The prevalence of persons with mental illness in American correctional systems is significant and ever-increasing. The rate of mental illness among inmates is estimated to be 2 to 3 times higher than in the general community. Particularly affected subpopulations of offenders include females, Whites, elderly, developmentally disabled, substance disordered, administratively segregated, and maximum and supermax-offenders. Those mentally ill offenders in correctional systems have a constitutional right to treatment and American society has a duty to provide it. Limited evidence suggests that prison-based programming is effective at reducing recidivism; thus, the costs of treating mentally ill offenders may actually result in long-run cost savings for taxpayers if treatment prevents future incarcerations. To afford treatment to mentally ill offenders, corrections officials need to embrace the treatment mandate by adopting and implementing meaningful mental health treatment policies and programs in their facilities. Prisons are increasingly being filled with inmates who suffer from mental illness. The purpose of this paper is to examine the prevalence of mental illness in American jails and prisons, the duty government and society has to provide appropriate mental health treatment, and the implications for inmate safety, costs, recidivism, and community reintegration if meaningful mental health treatment is not provided. References
Main Term(s): Mentally ill inmates
Index Term(s): Corrections effectiveness; Inmate drug treatment; Inmate Programs; Inmate treatment; Inmates; Mental health services; Mentally ill offenders; Offender mental health services; Treatment; Treatment effectiveness
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=243574

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