skip navigation

PUBLICATIONS

Register for Latest Research

Stay Informed
Register with NCJRS to receive NCJRS's biweekly e-newsletter JUSTINFO and additional periodic emails from NCJRS and the NCJRS federal sponsors that highlight the latest research published or sponsored by the Office of Justice Programs.

NCJRS Abstract

The document referenced below is part of the NCJRS Virtual Library collection. To conduct further searches of the collection, visit the Virtual Library. See the Obtain Documents page for direction on how to access resources online, via mail, through interlibrary loans, or in a local library.

 

NCJ Number: 227856 Find in a Library
Title: Attributional Antecedents of Alcohol Use in American Indian and Euroamerican Adolescents
Journal: American Indian and Alaska Native Mental Health Research  Volume:5  Issue:2  Dated:1993  Pages:46-56
Author(s): Grace Powless Sage Ph.D.; G. Leonard Burns Ph.D.
Date Published: 1993
Page Count: 11
Document: HTML
Type: Report (Study/Research)
Format: Article
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This study compared American Indian and Euroamerican adolescents regarding the events they viewed as responsible for their alcohol use.
Abstract: The study found that American-Indian male youth believed that heredity played a more important role in their alcohol use than did Euroamerican male youth. American-Indian males also viewed fate as a more important influence on their alcohol use than did American-Indian female youth and Euroamerican female youth. American-Indian males also viewed environmental events, such as problems at home, as a less important influence on their alcohol use compared to Euroamerican males and females and American-Indian females. Euroamerican female youth viewed distressing events as more responsible for their alcohol use than did the American-Indian females and Euroamerican males. Euroamerican females also considered themselves as more responsible for their alcohol use than did the American-Indian females and males and Euroamerican males. Another major finding was the amount of alcohol use reported by the American-Indian 11th graders. They reported significantly more alcohol use than the three other groups (American-Indian 9th graders and Euroamerican 9th and 11th graders). Fifty percent of the American-Indian 11th graders reported weekly or daily use of alcohol. Although causality cannot be inferred from these findings, prevention and early intervention programs should take into account why adolescents believe they use alcohol, particularly when they may be able to control some of the factors they cite. Of the 106 high school freshmen involved in the study, 53 were American Indian (25 females and 28 males), and 53 were Euroamerican (28 females and 25 males). Of the 106 high school juniors in the study, 53 were American Indian (19 females and 34 males), and 53 were Euroamerican (28 females and 25 males). All participants were administered Beckman's rating scale for antecedents of alcohol use. 2 tables, 20 references, and 1 note
Main Term(s): Underage Drinking
Index Term(s): Adolescent attitudes; Alcohol abuse prevention; Alcoholism causes; American Indians; Caucasian/White Americans; Comparative analysis; Gender issues
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=249865

*A link to the full-text document is provided whenever possible. For documents not available online, a link to the publisher's website is provided. Tell us how you use the NCJRS Library and Abstracts Database - send us your feedback.