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NCJ Number: 228088 Find in a Library
Title: Implications of Treating Family Violence for the Therapist: Secondary Traumatization, Vicarious Traumatization, and Growth
Journal: Journal of Family Violence  Volume:24  Issue:7  Dated:October 2009  Pages:507-515
Author(s): Anat Ben-Porat; Haya Itzhaky
Date Published: October 2009
Page Count: 9
Publisher: http://www.springer.com 
Type: Research (Applied/Empirical)
Format: Article
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This study examined the specific implications of working with victims of family violence on therapists in terms of secondary traumatization, vicarious traumatization, and growth.
Abstract: In examining a group of social workers employed in the field of family violence and a group of social workers who were not employed in the field of family violence, the two groups did not differ significantly in levels of secondary traumatization. However, significant differences were found in levels of growth and levels of positive and negative changes that the participants experienced in themselves, their lives, and their families. In recent years, increasing attention has been given to the perspective of therapists who work with trauma victims, including family violence therapists. In that context, emphasis has been placed on issues related to the unique implications of working in the field of family violence for the therapist, as well as on the changes that take place in the therapists themselves, their lives, and the lives of their families as a result. Utilizing a qualitative design, this study examined the specific implications of working with victims of family violence on therapists in terms of secondary traumatization, vicarious traumatization, and growth. The study was conducted through comparison of two groups of participants, where each group had different levels of exposure to work in the field of family violence. Tables, figures, and references
Main Term(s): Social workers
Index Term(s): Domestic assault; Family counseling; Family offenses; Psychiatric services; Social worker casework; Victim services; Victims of violent crime
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=250100

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