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NCJ Number: 229435 Find in a Library
Title: Early Adolescents' Participation in Bullying: Is ToM Involved?
Journal: Journal of Early Adolescence  Volume:30  Issue:1  Dated:February 2010  Pages:138-170
Author(s): Simona C.S. Caravita; Paola Di Blasio; Christina Salmivalli
Date Published: February 2010
Page Count: 33
Document: HTML (Publisher Site)
Publisher: http://www.sagepub.com 
Type: Report (Study/Research)
Format: Article
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This study examined the role of theory of mind (ToM) skills in early adolescents' participation in bullying.
Abstract: The present study investigated the role of theory of mind (ToM) skills in three forms of involvement in bullying: ringleader bullying, defending the victim(s), and victimization. Individual (affective empathy) and interpersonal variables (social preference and perceived popularity) were assumed to moderate the associations between ToM and the ways of being involved in bullying. Moderation effects by gender were also explored. Participants were 211 primary school pupils (average age = 10 years and 2 months, SD = 6 months), who took part in a ToM interview and filled in self- and peer-report questionnaires on empathy, social status, and involvement in bullying. ToM skills were positively linked to defending, and among boys this association was further strengthened by social preference. Practical implications include the need to focus on both peer relationships (i.e., status) and emotional characteristics (i.e., empathy) when trying to motivate youth with good cognitive skills to actively defend their victimized classmates. (Publisher Abstract)
Main Term(s): Bullying; Juveniles
Index Term(s): Adolescent attitudes; Aggression; Behavioral science research; Gender issues; Peer influences on behavior
Note: For additional articles in this special issue see NCJ-229429-34 and NCJ-229436.
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=251462

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