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NCJ Number: 229450 Find in a Library
Title: Effects of Stereotypes and Suggestion on Memory
Journal: International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology  Volume:54  Issue:1  Dated:February 2010  Pages:113-130
Author(s): Israel Nachson; Joseph Glicksohn; Mally Shechory
Date Published: February 2010
Page Count: 18
Document: HTML (Publiaher SIte)
Publisher: http://www.sagepub.com 
Type: Report (Study/Research)
Format: Article
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: In this study, the interactive effect of stereotype and suggestion on accuracy of memory was examined by presenting 645 participants (native Israelis and immigrants from the former Soviet Union and Ethiopia) with three versions of a story about a worker who is waiting in a manager's office for a meeting.
Abstract: All versions were identical except for the worker's name, which implied a Russian or an Ethiopian immigrant or a person of no ethnic origin. Each participant was presented with one version of the story. After an hour delay, the participants' memories were tested via two questionnaires that differed in terms of level of suggestion. Data analyses show that (a) when a suggestion matched the participant's stereotypical perception, the suggestion was incorporated into memory but (b) when the suggestion contradicted the stereotype, it did not influence memory. The conclusion was that recall is influenced by stereotypes but can be enhanced by compatible suggestions. (Publisher Abstract)
Main Term(s): Criminology
Index Term(s): Cultural influences; Eyewitness memory; Field interrogation and interview; Foreign criminal justice research; Interview and interrogation; Israel; Police interviewing training
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=251479

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