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NCJ Number: 229522 Find in a Library
Title: Indiscriminate Friendliness in Maltreated Foster Children
Journal: Child Maltreatment  Volume:15  Issue:1  Dated:February 2010  Pages:64-75
Author(s): Katherine C. Pears; Jacqueline Bruce; Philip A. Fisher; Hyoun K. Kim
Date Published: February 2010
Page Count: 12
Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Mental Health
Bethesda, MD 20852
National Institute on Drug Abuse
Bethesda, MD 20892-9561
US Dept of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service
Rockville, MD 20878
Grant Number: R01 DA021424;R01 MH059780
Document: HTML (Publisher Site)
Publisher: http://www.sagepub.com 
Type: Report (Study/Research)
Format: Article
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This study compared levels of indiscriminate friendliness in maltreated foster children and nonmaltreated children.
Abstract: Indiscriminate friendliness is well documented in children adopted internationally following institutional rearing but is less studied in maltreated foster children. Precursors and correlates of indiscriminate friendliness were examined in 93 preschool-aged maltreated children residing in foster care and 60 age-matched, nonmaltreated children living with their biological parents. Measures included parent reports, official case record data, and standardized laboratory assessments. Foster children exhibited higher levels of indiscriminate friendliness than nonmaltreated children. Inhibitory control was negatively associated with indiscriminate friendliness even after controlling for age and general cognitive ability. Additionally, the foster children who had experienced a greater number of foster caregivers had poorer inhibitory control, which was in turn associated with greater indiscriminate friendliness. The results indicate a greater prevalence of indiscriminate friendliness among foster children and suggest the indiscriminate friendliness is part of a larger pattern of dysregulation associated with inconsistency in caregiving. Tables, figures, and references (Published Abstract)
Main Term(s): Abused-nonabused child comparisons
Index Term(s): Abused children; Child care services; Child development; Foster adolescents; Youth development
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=251551

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