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NCJ Number: 229537 Find in a Library
Title: Relationship Between Multiple Sources of Perceived Social Support and Psychological and Academic Adjustment in Early Adolescence: Comparisons Across Gender
Journal: Journal of Youth and Adolescence  Volume:39  Issue:1  Dated:January 2010  Pages:47-61
Author(s): Sandra Yu Rueger; Christine Kerres Malecki; Michelle Kilpatrick Demaray
Date Published: January 2010
Page Count: 15
Document: HTML (Publisher Site)
Publisher: http://www.springer.com 
Type: Report (Study/Research)
Format: Article
Language: English
Country: Netherlands
Annotation: This study investigated gender differences in the relationship between sources of perceived support (parent, teacher, classmate, friend, school) and psychological and academic adjustment in a sample of 636 (49 percent male) middle school students.
Abstract: Longitudinal data were collected at two time points in the same school year. The study provided psychometric support for the Child and Adolescent Social Support Scale (Malecki et al., A working manual on the development of the Child and Adolescent Social Support Scale (2000). Unpublished manuscript, Northern Illinois University, 2003) across gender, and demonstrated gender differences in perceptions of support in early adolescence. In addition, there were significant associations between all sources of support with depressive symptoms, anxiety, self-esteem, and academic adjustment, but fewer significant unique effects of each source. Parental support was a robust unique predictor of adjustment for both boys and girls, and classmates' support was a robust unique predictor for boys. These results illustrate the importance of examining gender differences in the social experience of adolescents with careful attention to measurement and analytic issues. Tables and references (Published Abstract)
Main Term(s): Juvenile psychological evaluation
Index Term(s): Adolescent females; Adolescent males; Education; Gender issues; Psychological evaluation; Youth development
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=251567

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