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NCJ Number: 229587 Find in a Library
Title: Keeping Resident Informed Electronically
Journal: Law and Order  Volume:57  Issue:11  Dated:November 2009  Pages:38-42
Author(s): Al Varga
Date Published: November 2009
Page Count: 5
Publisher: http://www.hendonpub.com 
Type: Issue Overview
Format: Article
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This article describes three Internet companies that make crime information available to the public and the effectiveness of these companies from a police point of view.
Abstract: Keeping the public informed on crime in their neighborhoods is an integral part of law enforcement's job. However, getting the information to citizens can be costly and time consuming. Today, residents of many cities and towns are informed daily about police arrests, crimes, and investigations. This is accomplished through Internet companies that partner with police departments to provide crime information to the public on a daily basis for a monthly fee. This article describes three such Internet companies: Crime Reports.com, CrimeMapping.com, and EveryBlock.com. From the police point of view, the article describes how the companies work with the police, how the system works, what the costs are, and if their concept is beneficial.
Main Term(s): Police-citizen interactions
Index Term(s): Electronic bulletin boards; Police community relations; Police effectiveness; Police information systems; Policing innovation; Public information
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http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=251617

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