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NCJRS Abstract

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NCJ Number: 229694 Find in a Library
Title: Analysis of Pigmented Inkjet Printer Inks and Printed Documents by Laser Desorption/Mass Spectrometry
Journal: Journal of Forensic Sciences  Volume:55  Issue:1  Dated:January 2010  Pages:129-135
Author(s): Shawn Donnelly; Josette E. Marrero; Trevor Cornell; Kevin Fowler; John Allison Ph.D.
Date Published: January 2010
Page Count: 7
Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice (NIJ)
Washington, DC 20531
Grant Number: 2005-IJ-CX-K064
Publisher: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com 
Type: Report (Study/Research)
Format: Article
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: Anyone with a computer, scanner, and color printer has the capability for creating documents such as identification cards, passports, and counterfeit currency. Laser desorption mass spectrometry (LDMS) has been demonstrated as a powerful tool for colorant analysis.
Abstract: Inkjet printers are now moving largely toward the use of pigments as colorants; their insolubility makes analysis by simpler methods such as thin-layer chromatography no longer an option. Recent developments in pigmented inkjet printer inks, such as gloss optimizers that coat pigment particles, may prohibit colorant analysis by LDMS. We demonstrate here that pigments used in inks from two Epson printers can be detected and analyzed by LDMS. Also, LDMS spectra of various colors created using a four-cartridge (cyan/magenta/yellow/black, CMYK) inkset are evaluated, to begin to develop an approach for unraveling LDMS data from real samples, to determine the number of inks used by a printer, and the chemical composition of the colorants. 6 figures and 25 references (Published abstract)
Main Term(s): Criminology
Index Term(s): Computer hardware systems; Computer related crime; Counterfeiting; Forensic sciences; Ink analyses; Investigative techniques; Spectroscopy
Note: Presented at the 60th Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences, February 18-23, 2008, in Washington, DC.
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=251726

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