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NCJRS Abstract

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NCJ Number: 229722 Find in a Library
Title: More Than a Just a Game: Video Game and Internet Use During Emerging Adulthood
Journal: Journal of Youth and Adolescence  Volume:39  Issue:2  Dated:February 2010  Pages:103-113
Author(s): Laura M. Padilla-Walker; Larry J. Nelson; Jason S. Carroll; Alexander C. Jensen
Date Published: February 2010
Page Count: 11
Document: HTML (Publisher Site)
Publisher: http://www.springer.com 
Type: Research (Applied/Empirical)
Format: Article
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This study examined the pattern of video game and Internet use among a sample of college students and how this leisure pattern might be related to risk behaviors, perceptions of self, and relationships with others.
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to gain a clearer understanding of the pattern of video game and internet use among college students and to examine how electronic leisure was related to risk behaviors (i.e., drinking, drug use, sex), perceptions of the self (i.e., self worth and social acceptance), and relationships with others (i.e., relationship quality with parents and friends). Participants included 813 undergraduate students (500 young women, 313 young men, M age = 20, SD = 1.87) who were mainly European American (79 percent), unmarried (100 percent) and living outside their parents' home (90 percent). Results suggested that (a) video game use was linked to negative outcomes for men and women, (b) different patterns of video game and internet use existed for men and women and (c) there were different relations to risk behaviors, feelings about the self, and relationship quality based on the type of internet use, and based on gender. The discussion focuses on the implications of electronic leisure on the overall health and development of young people as they transition to adulthood. Tables and references (Published Abstract)
Main Term(s): Young Adults (18-24)
Index Term(s): Behavior patterns; Behavioral and Social Sciences; Computers; Risk taking behavior; Students
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=251754

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