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NCJ Number: 229807 Find in a Library
Title: Examining an Extension of Johnson's Hypothesis: Is Male Perpetrated Intimate Partner Violence More Underreported than Female Violence?
Journal: Journal of Family Violence  Volume:25  Issue:2  Dated:February 2010  Pages:173-181
Author(s): Clifton R. Emery
Date Published: February 2010
Page Count: 9
Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice (NIJ)
Washington, DC 20531
Grant Number: 2005-WG-BX-0001
Document: HTML (Publisher Site)
Dataset: DATASET 1  DATASET 2
Publisher: http://www.springer.com 
Type: Research (Applied/Empirical)
Format: Article
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This paper examines to what extent rates of intimate partner violence are underestimated and whether the amount of under-reporting of male intimate partner violence is greater than the under-reporting of female intimate partner violence.
Abstract: This paper examines two hypotheses about under-reporting in intimate partner violence data. The first hypothesis holds that significant amounts of under-reporting of intimate partner violence occur due to stigma. The second examines the empirical evidence behind Johnson's (Journal of Marriage and the Family 57:238-294, 1995) contention that controversial findings of equal rates of intimate partner violence perpetration among men and women occur through a combination of heterogeneity in type of intimate partner violence and missing data. E.M. and Data Augmentation are used to correct for item non-response in the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods. Strong support is found for general under-reporting; weak support is found for greater under-reporting of male violence. Tables, figures, and references (Published Abstract)
Main Term(s): Domestic assault
Index Term(s): Data collections; Data integrity; Domestic violence causes; NIJ grant-related documents; Self-report studies; Violent men; Violent women
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=251839

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