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NCJ Number: 229823 Find in a Library
Title: Crime Risks of Three-Dimensional Virtual Environments
Author(s): Ian Warren; Darren Palmer
Date Published: February 2010
Page Count: 6
Sponsoring Agency: Australian Institute of Criminology
Canberra ACT, 2601, Australia
Sale Source: Australian Institute of Criminology
GPO Box 2944
Canberra ACT, 2601,
Australia
Document: PDF
Publisher: https://www.aic.gov.au 
Type: Report (Study/Research)
Format: Document
Language: English
Country: Australia
Annotation: This paper examines types of harm emerging in virtual worlds or cybercrimes.
Abstract: Three-dimensional virtual environments (3dves) are the new generation of digital multi-user social networking platforms. Their immersive character allows users to create a digital humanized representation or avatar, enabling a degree of virtual interaction not possible through conventional text-based internet technologies. As recent international experience demonstrates, in addition to the conventional range of cybercrimes (including economic fraud, the dissemination of child pornography and copyright violations), the 'virtual-reality' promoted by 3dves is the source of great speculation and concern over a range of specific and emerging forms of crime and harm to users. This paper provides some examples of the types of harm currently emerging in 3dves and suggests internal regulation by user groups, terms of service, or end-user licensing agreements, possibly linked to real-world criminological principles. This paper also provides some directions for future research aimed at understanding the role of Australian criminal law and the justice system more broadly in this emerging field. Table, figure, and references (Published Abstract)
Main Term(s): Virtual reality
Index Term(s): Australia; Computer related crime; Computer software; Criminology; Foreign laws; Social network analysis
Note: AIC Trends and Issues in Crime and Criminal Justice No. 388, February 2010
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=251855

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