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NCJ Number: 235983 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: President's Drug Strategy: Two Years Later - Is It Working?
Corporate Author: US Senate
Senate Judicial Cmtte
United States of America

U.S. Senate Caucus on International Narcotics Control
United States of America
Date Published: September 1991
Page Count: 226
Sponsoring Agency: NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
Senate Document Room
Washington, DC, 20510
U.S. Senate Caucus on International Narcotics Control
Washington, DC 20510
US Senate
Washington, DC, 20510
Sale Source: NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America

Senate Document Room
B-04 Hart Bldg
Washington, DC, 20510
United States of America
Type: Legislation/Policy Analysis
Format: Document
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This 1991 report from the majority staffs of the Senate Judiciary Committee and the International Narcotics Control Caucus presents an analysis of the effectiveness of the second year of the President’s drug control strategy.
Abstract: Major findings from this 1991 report regarding the successes and failures of the second year of the President’s drug control strategy are divided into seven specific areas. In law enforcement, positive signs include increased cocaine prices and decreased cocaine purities, and increased funding for Federal drug law enforcement agencies, while negative signs include decreases in the number of Federal drug prosecutors and lack of support from the Administration for State and local law enforcement. In drug treatment, while spending has increased it has not been enough to combat the increase in the number of hard-core drug addicts. In the area of education and prevention, the increase in local and State drug prevention efforts has not been matched by funding from Federal agencies to assist with these efforts. The other areas where the strategy has not produced results include interdiction and border control, international drug control, coordination and management, and assistance for the hardest hit areas. The report sites lack of coordination and funding as the primary reasons for failure in these areas. Figures and appendixes
Main Term(s): Drug Policy
Index Term(s): Drug abuse; Drug abuse education; Drug abuse in foreign countries; Drug Courts; Drug enforcement officers; Drug eradication programs; Drug law enforcement; Drug laws; Drug prevention programs; Drug prices; Drug purity; Drug use; Federal drug laws
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=257971

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