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NCJ Number: 236209 Find in a Library
Title: Does a Draft Really Influence Postmortem Body Cooling?
Journal: Journal of Forensic Sciences  Volume:56  Issue:5  Dated:September 2011  Pages:1310-1314
Author(s): Michal Kaliszan, M.D., Ph.D., S.F.M.
Date Published: September 2011
Page Count: 5
Publisher: http://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA 
Type: Report (Study/Research)
Format: Article
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This study aimed at verification of the significance of airflow present in the room where a corpse is found on body cooling process and hence on determination of the time of death (TOD).
Abstract: Estimation of the time of death (TOD) is a very important task of forensic pathologist, and measurement of body temperature is a method deemed to be most precise during the initial postmortem period. The study aimed at verification of the significance of airflow present in the room where a corpse is found on body cooling process and hence on determination of the TOD. The experiment was performed in pigs during which the postmortem temperature of the eye, muscles, and rectum was recorded—in still air and with generated draft in the room. The results showed that the moderate airflow present in the experimental conditions did not significantly affect the course of cooling of the investigated body sites. Despite moderate wind generated in the room, the air movement close to pigs’ bodies was actually minimal. This allowed to conclude that to evaluate the TOD most precisely, one should first have reliable data on the actual velocity of air in the direct vicinity of the body rather than relying on subjective sensation of the draft and using various unnecessary corrective coefficients for TOD calculation. (Published Abstract)
Main Term(s): Criminology
Index Term(s): Crime scene; Death investigations; Foreign criminal justice research; Forensic sciences; Investigative techniques; Poland; Time of death determination
Note: Presented at the 62nd Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences, February 22–27, 2010, in Seattle, WA.
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=258203

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