skip navigation

PUBLICATIONS

Register for Latest Research

Stay Informed
Register with NCJRS to receive NCJRS's biweekly e-newsletter JUSTINFO and additional periodic emails from NCJRS and the NCJRS federal sponsors that highlight the latest research published or sponsored by the Office of Justice Programs.

NCJRS Abstract

The document referenced below is part of the NCJRS Virtual Library collection. To conduct further searches of the collection, visit the Virtual Library. See the Obtain Documents page for direction on how to access resources online, via mail, through interlibrary loans, or in a local library.

 

NCJ Number: 236670 Find in a Library
Title: Multiplex PCR Assay to Differentiate Between Dog and Red Fox
Journal: Forensic Science International: Genetics  Volume:5  Issue:5  Dated:November 2011  Pages:411-414
Author(s): M. Weissenberger; W. Reichert; R. Mattern
Date Published: November 2011
Page Count: 4
Publisher: http://www.elsevier.com 
Type: Report (Study/Research)
Format: Article
Language: English
Country: Ireland
Annotation: Since insurance claims that involve accidents with animals require authentication, this study analyzed frequency distribution and allele sizes in two canine microsatellite loci in 26 dogs (different breeds) and 19 red foxes of the region of BW, Germany.
Abstract: Foxes are frequently the cause of car accidents in Baden-Württemberg (BW, Germany). The domestic dog (Canis familiaris) is in close relation to the red fox (Vulpes vulpes) and the silver fox which is a coat color variant of the red fox. As insurance claims that involve accidents with animals require authentication, this study analyzed frequency distribution and allele sizes in 2 canine microsatellite loci in 26 dogs (different breeds) and 19 red foxes of the region of BW, Germany. Moreover, sequencing analysis was performed. Red foxes exhibited only 1 allele at each microsatellite locus, whereas in dog 7 alleles at the CPH4 locus and 6 alleles at the CPH12 locus were detected. Sequences of PCR products from the two species revealed several differences between dogs and foxes. The authors established a sequenced allelic ladder and give population data from dogs and red foxes from the region of BW, Germany. Using microsatellite polymorphisms is efficient in differentiating between dogs and foxes in forensic casework. (Published Abstract)
Main Term(s): Forensic sciences
Index Term(s): Animals (law enforcement); DNA fingerprinting; Foreign criminal justice research; Germany; Investigative techniques; Traffic accidents
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=258685

*A link to the full-text document is provided whenever possible. For documents not available online, a link to the publisher's website is provided. Tell us how you use the NCJRS Library and Abstracts Database - send us your feedback.