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NCJ Number: 236919 Find in a Library
Title: Perceptions of Crime, Engagement with the Police, Authorities Dealing with Anti-Social Behaviour and Community Payback: Findings From the 2010/11 British Crime Survey, Supplementary Volume 1 to Crime in England and Wales 2010/11
Author(s): Jenny Parfrement-Hopkins; Philip Hall; Jacqueline Hoare; Ivy Lau; Jenny Innes
Editor(s): Debbie Moon; John Flately
Date Published: November 2011
Page Count: 74
Sponsoring Agency: Great Britain Home Office
Croydon, Surrey CR0 9YD, England
Publication Number: ISBN 978 1 84987 598 1
Sale Source: Great Britain Home Office
Research and Statistics Dept
Lunar House, Room 1834B
40 Wellesley Road
Croydon, Surrey CR0 9YD,
United Kingdom
Document: PDF
Type: Report (Annual/Periodic)
Format: Document
Language: English
Country: United Kingdom
Annotation: This report presents the findings from the 2010-2011 British Crime Survey on citizens’ perceptions of crime, engagement with the police, authorities dealing with antisocial behavior, and the Community Payback program.
Abstract: Major findings from the 2010-2011 British Crime Survey include: 55 percent of individuals reported seeing a police officer on foot patrol at least once a month, 39 percent reported seeing an officer on foot patrol at least once a week, and 25 reported never seeing an officer on foot patrol; awareness of local neighborhood police teams increased from 39 percent in 2009-2010 to 44 percent in 2010-2011; 23 percent of respondents had made contact with the police in 2010-2011; the number of individuals contacting the police for reasons other than to talk about local issues decreased from 43 percent in 2009-2010 to 23 percent in 2010-2011; about 1 in 10 persons had been in a vehicle that had been approached or stopped by the police during 2010-2011; 52 percent of respondents were confident in police efforts to reduce antisocial behaviors in their neighborhoods; respondents who thought the local police were doing an excellent or good job were twice as likely to be confident in police efforts to reduce antisocial behavior; 85 percent of respondents were aware of the Community Payback program, yet only 15 percent had personally seen offenders carrying out Community Payback work; and respondents who had heard of or were aware of Community Payback were less confident in the effectiveness of the criminal justice system. This report presents the findings of the 2010-2011 British Crime Survey that examined citizens’ perceptions of crime, engagement with the police, authorities’ ability to deal with antisocial behavior, and the Community Payback program. The British Crime Survey is a large, nationally representative survey that collects data through one-on-one interviews of residents in England and Wales regarding their experiences of crime in the 12 months prior to the interview. Tables, figures, and bibliography
Main Term(s): Crime surveys
Index Term(s): Antisocial attitudes; Citizen reactions to crime; Great Britain/United Kingdom; National crime surveys; Public Attitudes/Opinion; Public Opinion of the Police; Victim attitudes
Note: Home Office Statistical Bulletin 18/11, November 2011
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=258939

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