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NCJ Number: 237006 Find in a Library
Title: Moral Reasoning and Aggressive Behavior: Concurrent and Longitudinal Relations
Journal: Journal of School Violence  Volume:10  Issue:3  Dated:July-September 2011  Pages:258-280
Author(s): Maureen A. Manning; George G. Bear
Date Published: July 2011
Page Count: 23
Sponsoring Agency: Assoc for Moral Education

Delaware Dept of Education
Dover, DE 19901
William T. Grant Foundation
New York, NY 10022
Document: PDF
Type: Research (Applied/Empirical)
Format: Article
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This study determined whether two forms of moral reasoning commonly found in early elementary school, self-oriented and psychological needs-oriented, are related to both current and future aggression.
Abstract: The purposes of this study were to determine whether two forms of moral reasoning commonly found in early elementary school, self-oriented and psychological needs-oriented, are related to both current and future aggression. A total of 132 students participated in a study that began when they were in first or second grade and concluded 2 years later. Concurrent and longitudinal relations were found for overt aggression, and for both reactive and proactive functions of aggression. Psychological needs-oriented reasoning in early elementary school predicted aggression in later elementary school. Moral reasoning did not moderate the stability of aggression over time, however. Results have implications for school discipline practices and violence prevention and intervention programs. (Published Abstract)
Main Term(s): Moral development
Index Term(s): Aggression; Juvenile (Under 18); Violence prevention
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=259026

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