skip navigation

PUBLICATIONS

Register for Latest Research

Stay Informed
Register with NCJRS to receive NCJRS's biweekly e-newsletter JUSTINFO and additional periodic emails from NCJRS and the NCJRS federal sponsors that highlight the latest research published or sponsored by the Office of Justice Programs.

NCJRS Abstract

The document referenced below is part of the NCJRS Virtual Library collection. To conduct further searches of the collection, visit the Virtual Library. See the Obtain Documents page for direction on how to access resources online, via mail, through interlibrary loans, or in a local library.

 

NCJ Number: 237060 Find in a Library
Title: Filicide-Suicide in Chicago, 1870-1930
Journal: Journal of Interpersonal Violence  Volume:23  Issue:5  Dated:May 2008  Pages:589-599
Author(s): Todd K. Shackelford; Shanna L. Beasley; Viviana A Weekes-Shackelford
Date Published: May 2008
Page Count: 11
Document: PDF
Publisher: http://www.sagepub.com 
Type: Historical Overview; Report (Study/Research)
Format: Article
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This study tested several hypotheses about filicide-suicide using a database including incident-level information on 11,018 Chicago homicides during 1870-1930.
Abstract: Filicide (the killing of a child by a parent) followed by the offender's suicide is a tragic but, fortunately, rare event. The contexts and circumstances surrounding filicide-suicide may provide insight into parental psychology. The authors test several hypotheses about filicide-suicide using a database including incident-level information on 11,018 Chicago homicides during 1870-1930. The results provide some support for the hypothesis of differential risk of suicide following filicide by genetic parents and stepparents and replicate previous research indicating that filicides with multiple victims are more likely to end in the offender's suicide than are filicides with a single victim; parents are more likely to commit suicide following the filicide of an older child than of a younger child; and older parents, relative to younger parents, are more likely to commit suicide following filicide. The discussion situates these results within the existing literature and highlights important directions for future research. (Published Abstract)
Main Term(s): Criminology
Index Term(s): Abusing parents; Child abuse; Child fatalities; Illinois; Multiple victimization; Offense characteristics; Suicide; Suicide causes; Trend analysis
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=259086

*A link to the full-text document is provided whenever possible. For documents not available online, a link to the publisher's website is provided. Tell us how you use the NCJRS Library and Abstracts Database - send us your feedback.