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NCJ Number: 237113 Find in a Library
Title: Internalized Sexual Minority Stressors and Same-Sex Intimate Partner Violence
Journal: Journal of Family Violence  Volume:26  Issue:7  Dated:October 2011  Pages:501-509
Author(s): Amana F. Carvalho; Robin J. Lewis; Valerian J. Derlega; Barbara A. Winstead; Claudia Viggiano
Date Published: October 2011
Page Count: 9
Document: PDF
Publisher: http://www.springer.com 
Type: Report (Study/Research)
Format: Article
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This study examined the relationship among internalized homophobia, stigma consciousness, and openness to self-reported IPV victimization and perpetration.
Abstract: Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a serious problem in both same-sex and heterosexual relationships. Although there are numerous similarities in the dynamics of IPV, gay men and lesbians experience unique stressors related to their sexual minority status. This preliminary, descriptive study examined the relationship among internalized homophobia, stigma consciousness, and openness to self-reported IPV victimization and perpetration. Among 581 men and lesbians, approximately one-quarter reported IPV victimization and almost 10 percent reported IPV perpetration. When demographic variables of age, sex of participant, and relationship status were controlled, victims of IPV reported greater expectations of prejudice and discrimination, yet were more open about their sexual orientation. Similarly, expectations of prejudice and discrimination were related to IPV perpetration. As researchers and counselors focus on understanding, and ultimately reducing, same-sex IPV, it is imperative that sexual minority stressors are considered. (Published Abstract)
Main Term(s): Victims of violent crime
Index Term(s): Behavior under stress; Domestic assault; Homosexuality; Stress assessment; Stress management
Note: Portions of this research were presented at the 2006 Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues Biannual convention, the 2006 Virginia Psychological Association spring convention, and at the 2011 American Psychological Association annual meeting.
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=259139

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