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NCJ Number: 237116 Find in a Library
Title: Relation of Harsh and Permissive Discipline with Child Disruptive Behaviors: Does Child Gender Make a Difference in an At-Risk Sample?
Journal: Journal of Family Violence  Volume:26  Issue:7  Dated:October 2011  Pages:527-533
Author(s): Justin Parent; Rex Forehand; Mary Jane Merchant; Mark C. Edwards; Nicola A. Conners-Burrow; Nicholas Long; Deborah J. Jones
Date Published: October 2011
Page Count: 7
Document: PDF
Publisher: http://www.springer.com 
Type: Report (Study/Research)
Format: Article
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This study examined the individual, unique, and interactive relation of two types of ineffective discipline (i.e., harsh & permissive) with child disruptive behavior for at-risk boys and girls separately.
Abstract: The role of parenting in child disruptive behaviors has received substantial support; however, the findings as to differential effects of specific parenting behaviors (e.g., discipline) on boys’ and girls’ disruptive behavior problems have not been consistent. The current study examined the individual, unique, and interactive relation of two types of ineffective discipline (i.e., harsh & permissive) with child disruptive behavior for at-risk boys and girls separately. Participants were 160 parents with 3- to 6-year-old at-risk children (47.5 percent girls). Findings revealed that higher levels of harsh discipline were related to more intense disruptive behavior of both boys and girls, whereas higher levels of permissive discipline were related to more intense disruptive behavior of only boys. Additionally, results indicated that harsh and permissive discipline did not interact to predict child disruptive behavior problems. Clinical implications and directions for future research are discussed. (Published Abstract)
Main Term(s): Juvenile delinquency factors
Index Term(s): Children at risk; Discipline; Gender issues; Parental influence; Problem behavior
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=259142

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